Province of Cavite

 

Province of Cavite

Income Classification: 1st Class
Congressional District: 7 Congressional Districts
No. of Cities and Municipalities: 6 Cities and 17 Municipalities
Land Area: 1,426.06 sq. km. 
Population (PSA-NSO 2010): 3,090,691
Registered Voters (COMELEC, May 17, 2016): 1,843,163

Newly Elected Local Officials (2016 Election)

Position
Governor
Vice Governor
Board Member 1st District
Board Member 1st District
Board Member 2nd District
Board Member 2nd District
Board Member 3rd District
Board Member 3rd District
Board Member 4th District
Board Member 4th District
Board Member 5th District
Board Member 5th District
Board Member 6th District
Board Member 6th District
Board Member 7th District
Board Member 7th District
Local Official
Crispin Remulla
Ramon Jolo Revilla, III
Ryan Enriquez
Gilbert Gandia
Edralin Gawaran
Reynaldo Fabian
Homer Saquilaya
Larry Nato
Valeriano Encabo
Teofilo Lara
Ivee Jayne Reyes
Marcos Amutan
Reymundo Del Rosario 
Felix Grepo 
Reyniel Ambion 
Reinalyn Varias 
Political Party
United Nationalist Alliance
LAKAS
United Nationalist Alliance
United Nationalist Alliance
LAKAS
LAKAS
Independent
Liberal Party
National Unity Party
National Unity Party
United Nationalist Alliance
United Nationalist Alliance
United Nationalist Alliance 
National Unity Party 
Liberal Party 
United Nationalist Alliance 
Term
1st
2nd
2nd 
1st
2nd
1st 
1st
2nd
1st
3rd
3r
1st
2nd
2nd 
1st 
1st 

 


About:
Cavite is the smallest province in the CALABARZON region. The Municipalities of Maragondon and Silang have the biggest land areas comprising 165.49 square kilometres (63.90 sq mi) and 156.41 square kilometres (60.39 sq mi) respectively, while municipality of Noveleta has the smallest land area as indicated by 5.41 square kilometres (2.09 sq mi) or 0.38 percent of the provincial total land area.

Historical Background:
Prior to the arrival of the Spaniards, Cavite was already a significant area of interest for foreign merchants and traders. The colonizers arriving in the late 16th century found significance to the unusual tongue of land thrust into Manila Bay. They perceived its value to become a main staging ground where they could launch their bulky galleons. Formed in the shape of a hook, which in Tagalog is called Kawit, it became the most significant port linking the colony to the outside world.

The present location of Cavite City was once a mooring place for Chinese junks trading that came to trade with the settlements around Manila Bay. In 1571, Spanish colonizers founded a port in the said area. They also fortified the settlement as the first line of defense for the city of Manila. Galleons were built and fitted at the port and many Chinese merchants settled in the communities of Bacoor and Kawit. The vibrant mix of traders, Spanish seamen and local residents gave rise to the use of pidgin Spanish called Chabacano. 

In 1614, the politico-military jurisdiction of Cavite was established. It covers all the present territory of Cavite except for the town of Maragondon, which used to belong to the Corregimiento of Mariveles. Maragondon was ceded to Cavite in 1754. Within Maragondon was a settlement established in 1663 for Christian exiles from Ternate, Mollucas. Considering that Cavite was a valuable asset due to its military importance, Cavite was attacked by foreigners in their quest to conquer Manila and the Philippines. 

The Dutch made a surprise attack on the city in 1647, pounding the port incessantly, but were repulsed. Likewise, in 1672, the British occupied the port during their two-year interregnum in the Philippines. American forces attacked the Spanish squadron in Cavite. The Spanish defeat marked the end of Spanish rule in the country. During the Spanish time, there is presence of missionary orders, specifically the friars, who played significant roles in the Spanish occupation of the country. These missionary orders acquired vast haciendas in Cavite during the 18th and 19th century. These haciendas became the source of bitter agrarian conflicts between the friar orders and Filipino farmers. This has pushed a number of Caviteños to live as outlaws. This opposition to the friar orders was an important factor that drove many Cavite residents to support reform, and later, independence.

In 1872, a mutiny by disgruntled navy men in Cavite led to a large-scale crackdown of reformers and liberals. Three Filipino priests – Jose Burgos, Mariano Gomez and Jacinto Zamora- were executed and dozens others were sent into exile. In 1896, after the outbreak of the Philippine Revolution, Cavite took center stage as thousands of Katipuneros liberated in most of the province's towns. On August 26, 1896, when the Philippine revolution against Spain broke out, Cavite became a bloody war theatre. Led by Emilio Aguinaldo, Caviteños made surprise attacks on the Spanish headquarters and soon liberated the whole province. Emilio Aguinaldo, the first Philippine president came from the town of Kawit and directed the conduct of the Revolution from his base in the province. He agreed to go into exile in December 1897, but returned to the Philippines in May 1898. 

On June 12, he declared Philippine independence from the balcony of his home in Kawit. The Americans established civil government in the province in 1901. The naval station in Sangley Point became the chief American naval base in the country. During the World War II, the Japanese targeted the naval base during the first wave of attacks on military installations in the Philippines. Cavite and its people, what they are today, and what will be tomorrow will remain their infinity, as a place with a glorious history, and a people fortified with strength to live and die for a worthy cause. 

Geographic Location:
Cavite is part of the Philippines’ largest island, the Luzon peninsula. Found in the southern portion, Cavite belongs to Region IV-A or the CALABARZON Region. It is bound by the province of Batangas in the south, Laguna in the east, Rizal in the northwest, Metro Manila and Manila Bay in the north, and West Philippine Sea in the west. Its proximity to Metro Manila gives the province significant edge in terms of economic development.

Major Income Sources: Agricultural and Non- Agricultural resources, Fisheries, Livestock and Poultry, Manufacturing, Services and Tourism

Special Events/Festivals: Kalayaan Festival, Regada Festival, Live Via Crusis or Kalbaryo ni Hesus, Fiesta de la Reina de Cavite, Sorteo Festival, Sumilang Festival, Kawayan Festival, Pahimis Festival, Wagayway Festival, Irok Festival, Sapyaw Festival, Mardicas, Hijas de Maria, Tahong Festival, Marching Band Festival, Tinapa Festival, Fiesta de la Reina de Caracol, Maytinis, Kakanindayog Festival, Pista ng mga Puso Festival, Kabutenyo Festival, Paru-paro Festival, Bihisaka Festival, Sapyaw Festival, Silang Prutas Festival, Sumilang Festival, Naikgikan Festival, Kawayan Festival

Contact Information:
Address: Cavite Provincial Capitol, Trece Martires City, Cavite
Phone: (046) 419-2311
Website: http://www.cavite.gov.ph



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